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to think over time, most big industrialized democracies because of the nature of our energy economy all have big state oil companies. so yes, in the industrialized west most of those states have privatize them, but even bp, as recently as the 1980's. so but only in america do we have exxon mobilize our state oil company. much more coherent expression of our national energy policy than anything the federal government as. and they are just as powerful relative to the state as tallis to france and maybe even more so yet only in america would we have a state oil company that lives in opposition to the state in which it resides. shrek stiller sent recently told scouting magazine that his favorite book is that this charge by i'm rant. that is a sort of touchstone for libertarians. it is an attitude of sort of skepticism, let's say generously toward the government that is peculiar. the equivalent company in france or italy or even in britain would be -- with have all gone to the same universities as the president of the united states. it would be buddies. it would be an interlocking sense of w
think that, as a person that's covered energy and environment for as long as i have -- this surprised me. you get into hydraulic fracturing which is now all over the news. today going to put out rauls for fracking on public lands. and you almost -- and you almost make the case that corporation prosecute -- that corporate philosophy gave them a blind spot when it came to high drawlic fracturing, and you make an amazing point that rex tillerton, as a young engineer at the company, actually was using the technique and so do you think in that one case in the fracking case, that corporate philosophy of, let's manage our risks, make sure we make a certain return on what we do -- hinder them from tapping into what is now this huge gas, huge economic opportunity in this country with natural gas? >> guest: they were slow but they're often slow and then they're dissive. so they get to places late and then buy their way in. that's their pattern. never had a great reputation as the greatest spoil goss discoverers. i'm sure they have some wins and a story they tell. thes about successes in exploratio
energy has been to develop a software strategy. a strategy that galvanizes regional publics, galvanizes these publics most intensely of grievances, including grievances against the united states and israel and most importantly against their own unrepresentative pro-western government in regime. amendment the islamic republic has done is aligned itself with public opinion at south in the middle east to constrain hostile governments from attacking a. just think about how barbering largely shia population would react to the fleetest our fifth fleet based in bahrain to attack the islamic republic today. u.s. military planners could hope that the iran's population would be passive as they think they assumed maybe even five years ago. but today it clearly seems reckless. for other ridiculing many american policy elites do with the islamic republic, the appeal to regional public actually works. it works to constrain the united states and hostile, unrepresentative pro-western neighboring iran. iran is also the two reinforce these aspects of a software strategy of a number of years at picking wh
the world a better place but do that for themselves. we combine that energy doing good work in the world but you have to have a right to your own life and radical that it -- radical decision making it to be a very thoughtful process and most importantly with a clear sense of purpose you can raise your self-esteem. that is a foundation for happiness. i made a good time on friday night but i call it blood sweat and tears happy when you're 80 years old to sing card earned energy that is the end of the game. nothing wrong with many it is not the end. happinesses the and. but properly aired is the foundation. i want to share one thought for everybody in the room the single biggest driver is your work of self-esteem you spent his portion it amount of time that is what makes work important and why the issue about unemployment is way more than economics, but a very spiritual issue because it is important. i say it is important you do your job well but mike told me how well you do your job you will never fool you. of the peter and do your work the best you can you go over your self-esteem. if you
of energy, does a possibility of a two-pillar solution using both saudi arabia and iran for security in the middle east exist, and that's possible -- if that's possible, does a potential expansion of u.s. domestic energy production open a door to a numbering solution? -- to a energy solution? thank you. >> i think the notion of a proxy war, i think i understand what you're saying. i think i'd use a different vocabulary from that. and this gets into the issue of the relationship with saudi arabia. what's going on right now in the middle east is that saudi arabia, as it has done at any number of points in its, in its modern history, is basically using the promotion of a particular sort of salafi islam. we tend to call it knew has been by islam in the u.s. although saudis don't really like that term. but this very particular notion of salafi islam, the kind of salafi islam we see embodied in, say, the taliban, saudi arabia actively promotes this kind of islam as a tool of its foreign policy. and, you know, under current circumstances in the region saudi efforts to do that are escalating
to live but something for themselves become bind our energy that people have about doing good work in the world, but doing it personally because you have to have the right to your own life. second, we had the highest respect for the rational decision making, making the logical decisions based on the fact, not invading the fact, been very thoughtful, very thoughtful process, but most importantly i think we can get a clear sense of purpose and use your capacity to accomplish the purchase you get to do something important. you get to raise your self-esteem. .. i want to share one thought with you. for everybody in the sermon the vast majority of people on this planet, the single biggest driver of self-esteem is your work because you spend a disproportionate amount of time and energy at work. that's what makes work important. that's why this issue about unemployment underemployment is way more than economics. it is actually a very spiritual issue because work is spiritually important. i've said many times, it's really important that you do your job well. as far, more important. you'll
of the denying quorum and in the case of speaking as long as you cou could, you had to spend time and energy, you had to organize and it was visible before this body. it was visible before the reporters gathered in the balcony. therefore, the american people, long before there was a television camera here, could see what you were doing and the public could provide feedback on that. but now we come to the modern era. from 1970 forward. in which it became popular to start using the objection as an instrument of party warfare, the objection to a final vote. you know, if we turn back before 1970, you had an overlap of the parties of perhaps 30 members. and so if one had used his objection, they'd have a good sense that you would be able to get cloture. furthermore, there was a social contract that you only interrupted the workings of this body on an issue of deep principle. you only blockaded the operations of the senate on an issue of profound concern to your state. not as a routine instrument of party politics. but that's changed over the last 45 years, since 1970 forward, the last 43 years, in whi
, which i mentioned earlier, but also renewable energies, greece has this capable due to the geographic call division. we can also look at quality agricultural products. it's another capability that greece has. we can look at energy on the whole. today greece is an energy hump. the inroads of the energy and roads of the 12st century run through greece today pane research, innovation, utilizing the country's scientific dynamic and potential. there's so many children that are heading out to other countries today. greece can return to the road of growth if it can overcome its endemic. weaknesses and with the help of all of those who not want to take advantage of grows but truly want to help it and stablize itself in europe. >> thank you very much. just a quick followup question, if you allow me. the national agenda is that you are in -- [inaudible] in washington last month you were in brazil. and emerging economy which has been growing quite faster together with other emerging economies especially in egypt and and indonesia. and these emerging economies have been also growing so fast -- [i
is increasingly economic policy, and we have an undersecretary for economic affairs, economics, energy etc.. i think that the state department historical use to have a foreign commercial service back in 1979. it slipped away. i think the secretary had the time -- i think that is something we ought to be doing in a very significant way. obviously working with the treasury with agriculture -- atta boy -- ag does and the treasury department does, and i think there is much more that we can do to augment our engagement in the private sector and their desires and needs abroad. i will give you an example. when i was in hong kong and number of years ago i met with our commercial service people. we had three of them. three people in hong kong. and they said they were overwhelmed. they had no ability to be given to mary rfp from china cummins writ with other countries. france was there, germany, england, others were much more aggressive in their promotion of their companies. and that is the world we are living in today. so i think we have to be much more aggressive in that respect. it's not an expenditu
. >> thank you for coming. for more than 30 years they served our country. during the energy natural resources committee a though. we are continuing to spend almost $400 billion a year to buy oil. and your colleague, senator lugar for a long time has told us the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and is sponsored and open feel standard to make a competitive market to move automobiles of drugs, whether it's not banal or whatever to have a market so when you drive a to the pump you have a choice in the price goes down. what do you think? do you think that's a good idea? at your colleague on, he saw stuart country. with a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> the technology developments and fracturing has become that competitive instrument that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that is going to put this in a completely different position than in the past. i don't think we need to -- we see me after to develop the sources of energy. they can't be competitive because of the new discoveries of oil and gas through shale that is a tot
government, mr. president. and, in fact, the ministry of energy. the minister of energy's sitting right there. and it's also the russian national oil company. and he goes on to talk about all of the ways in which these guys are raking off. at which point putin interrupts. he's been sitting there very calmly x in a very calm tone of voice he says i understand that you have a great many reserves that you are not p developing. and i understand that you, too, are having some problems with paying taxes. and he goes on to list in a very quiet voice some things that amount to saying that he is maybe himself the center of the corruption problem. and then very thin smile, there are videos of this confrontation. very thin smile, putin says and so, you see, i'm returning the hockey puck to you. [laughter] and there was this laughter, nervous laughter in the room. you can hear it on the tapes. and everybody knew in moscow by the next day that he was finished. so that really is what it comes down to. he defied the man. and so long as the man is there, it's hard to imagine -- [inaudible] we're hearing now
. look, i said this to my be staff today, i get a lot of psychic energy from being the mayor of the city, but yet i'm there, there's managers who get the job done every single day whose names you never hear about. i'm very proud to have been able to give a modicum of support to the incredible work you're doing. but you know there are heroes of light and energy that are working within covenant house in newark that are making transformative changes. there is a young kid one day that's going to be born to one of the children there that you'll never know their name who's going to know love. if you look into the stars tonight, and you live in manhattan, so you probably won't be able to see a star -- [laughter] but just think to yourself that that's hundreds of billions of light years away and many of of those stars that you're actually looking at are gone. they no longer exist n. the billions of years it's taken for that light to get to you, the star is gone. but the energy and light a body gives off while it's alive goes on forever. people be, generations yet unborn feel the warmth and light
. and then to tell you about this movement she would light up and got energy talking about the movement and excited about and i couldn't understand for her that was fulfilling because she felt this is the reason that my life has gone the past that it's gone this is what it's all been about. >> bernice did your mother and your family stay in the same house? >> after daddy was assassinated we stayed in the same house to get in fact the house wasn't purchased until 1966. my father had been influenced and he was struggling so she set look you have a wife and children and we have to have a place. they always talked about the fact that one day he probably would die a tragically. he said that's going to be my space. so he always anticipated that and new he knew so she made sure she brought that out and they were in the house until. >> or your grandparents on your mother's side or father's side? >> i visited my grandparents and alabama every summer for two weeks and i helped my grandmother with -- i helped her around the table setting up the dishes at the table and watching her cook and then alternatively
for coming. more than 30 years of service. the energy and natural resources committee, we are continuing to san $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil. your colleague senator lugar for a long time told us the only way to beat a cartel, sponsored open fuel standard, basically make a competitive market, the move, automobiles, trucks, weather is electricity or methanol or ethanol or whenever to have a market so that like brazil when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down. do you think that is a good idea? with your colleague gone now a huge loss to our country. would you be supportive of a competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> in fracturing that competitive instrument, that is causing that to happen. we had a great fortune of this technology to break through that is going to put this in a completely different position than we have been in the past so i don't think we need -- we have seen the effort to try to develop alternative competitive sources of energy. the problem is they can't be competitive, and particularly because of the new discovery of oil and
're on the energy and resources committee also, we are continuing to send almost $400 billion a year overseas to buy oil, and your colleague senator lugar, for a long time has told us that the only way to beat a cartel is through competition and he sponsored what is called an open-fuel standard. to basically make a competitive market to move automobiles, trucks, whether it's electricity or ethanol or whatever, to have a market so that brazil, when you drive up to the pump you have a choice and the price goes down, we think. do you think that's a good idea? and with your colleague gone now and the loss to our country would you be support i have of the competitive way to break the opec cartel? >> i think the technology developments and -- has become that competitive. that is causing that to happen. we had the great fortune of this technology that breakthrough take is going to put us in a different position than we've been in the past. i don't think -- we have seen the effort to try to determine and development alternative competitive because the discovery of oil and gas through shale and shale and thr
. they have a variety of energy drinks. there's an energy drink in colombia that a group produces called cocaset which has a great flavor to it but but, again, its not like drinking red bull. it would be much better for you. there's all kinds of ointments, there's a variety of breads and rolls made from coca flour. there's also these, um, this is the bag from what they call chasitos which are basically cheese puffs that the government is distributing to kids through a free breakfast program. the folks at the plant went on about how great these are. i thought they were awful myself, but i guess the kids like them. i also confess that i really hate coca toothpaste. but my point is that there are a variety of products that have very lis sit and good uses and should be available not only in these countries, but also on the international market. there are a variety of uses beyond what coca-cola uses for flavoring. another hypocrisy of the convention -- another hypocrisy that ricardo points to in his book is related to the conventions. i was really struck reading your book, i had not realized
. they probably think powerpoint is an energy drink, except they don't know what an energy drink is either. the data tell us that we should find these old codgers, or at least let them retire gracefully. but hold on. don't fire anybody yet. the air force academy study has another relevant finding. about student performance over a longer horizon. they found that in math and science students who have more experience and more highly credentialed instructors in introductory courses do better in their mandatory following courses and student of less experienced professors in the introductory courses. one logical interpretation is that the less experienced instructors are more likely to teach to the test in introductory courses. this produces impressive exam scores and happy students when it comes to filling out the instructor evaluation. meanwhile, the old crusty professors whom we nearly fired one paragraph ago, focus less on the exam and more on the important concepts, which are what matter most on the following courses and in life after the air force academy. clearly, we need to evaluate teac
japan faces, as you all know as well as i do, a number of problems. what is going to be the new energy policy, what's going to be the policy towards nuclear energy, the aging population. i could just run on, territorial disputes with its neighbors in china, korea. so there are a lot of different problems, but i think it's a crisis opportunity situation. the chinese use the expression wayy, so i think the new prime minister is the right person at the right time to take these steps but not limit them, as i said, to just monetary and fiscal. so i take advantage to meet all of these other problems and turn them into opportunities. one last point and then i will mention japan at the end of my brief remarks here. my good friend who died a number of years ago, rudy dornbush who was a brilliant economist and knew japan very well, he taught at mit, was always concerned that one day the high amount of government debt in japan would catch up to it. notwithstanding that over 90% of it is held by japanese. and, of course, now it's 235% of gdp, the largest of any developed country in the world. and
infrastructure, including the electric grid. and, of course, continue to encourage energy independence. the resolution of the supply of unfilled housing should be tried but only if a reelected barack obama can somehow find a unique instrument required to work with this administration to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with the congresswoman to pass legislation that this country so desperately needs. although it's not a -- one can ask will he be reelected. historically rarely have presidents been real elected to a second term with popular ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests, but so does romney. interesting to note that only three of the 19 presidents elected to a second term as relatively less popularity ratings at the time of their reelection. these are woodrow wilson, truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced trouble or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility of obama would win not based on statistics like this, but because the electorate elected him the best alternative of the two candi
, including the electric grid and of course continue to encourage any energy independence. the resolution of unsold houses should be sought, but all of this will occur only if a reelected barack obama could somehow find the unique temperament required to work with his administration, to move to the center and discover ways to reach meaningful compromise with a congress willing to pass legislation the country so desperately needs. what is not a subject of this paper, one can ask and will he be reelected? rarely have presidents been reelected to a second term as popularity ratings in the 40% level, which is where obama rests. so does romney. it's interesting to note only three of 19 presidents elected to a second term had relatively less popularity rating at the time of the reelection, as low as their election. but for wilson, harry truman and george w. bush. these presidents experienced troubled or failed second terms. history aside, one cannot discount the possibility obama would win by based on statistics like this, but because the electorate judges had the best alternative of the two ca
-funded energy efficiency scheme following the closure of -- last week? >> the eco-scheme which is many times the size of the warm front scheme him a warm front helped 80,000 pounds a year, eco-could help up to 230,000 families a year. so it's a bigger potential at a better scheme. >> what assessment has the prime minister made of unemployment in my constituency? in particular what assessment has he made having more women in work ever before? >> the point the honorable gentleman makes is absolutely right. there are now more people employed in the private sector than ever before and are also more women employed in our country than ever before. when you look at the unemployment figures that have come out today, what is remarkable is that employment is up in almost every region and unemployment is down in almost every region. there's a huge amount more to do but clearly over 500,000 new jobs in the private sector last year, the fastest job creation rate since 1989, this i think shows we are on the right track. >> mark intricate. >> mr. speaker, does the prime minister believed that the council,
of a single market and must remain so. but the single market remains incomplete and services, energy, the various sectors that are the engines of the economy is only half the success that it could be. it is nonsense people online in parts of europe are unable to access the best deals because of where they live. i want completing the single market to be our draping mission. i want us to be at the forefront, also to transform a trade deals with the japan, india as the drive towards global free trade and i want us to be pushing to extend europe's most entrepreneurial companies for more e.u. direct is. they should be the officials, the tasks that you european officials up in the morning and keep them working late into the night. so we urgently need to address the sclerotic on an affected decision-making us back. that means creating a leaner, less bureaucratic union relentlessly focused on helping countries to compete. can we really justify the huge number of expensive, expensive peripheral institutions? , justify commission that can ever larger? can we carry on with the multibillion poun
, renewable energy, reducing gun violence, and building an economy that last -- get this -- from the middle out. for all these reasons, and many more, it gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz to serve a second term at the helm of the democratic national committee. [applause] >> thank you. the chair now recognizes a member of the dnc spanish cauc caucus, for another session and speech. by the way, i'm not trying to hog the stage. if you want to come up here, feel welcome. >> i am okay. thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i am very honored. i come from the great state that gave you the most marvelous president, barack obama. [applause] >> i am also proud to join my fellow democrats nominating congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz for the chair of democratic national committee. while my home is illinois, florida is very close and dear to my heart. my family is smart enough to move out there 20 years ago, so i consider you my congresswoman, too. i've always, i thought of debbie wasserman schultz as my second congressman. it is my
until they are 26. i worked very hard on that in the house energy and commerce committee, and pleased to see it in the final act. i'm wondering especially given that your testimony talks a lot of the age of many profound mental illnesses being between 16 to 25 op woodring url lardy observing the positive impact of the increased level of insurance for that age population that age cohort. >> we know the provision to allow young people to stay on their parents' insurance and the provision to prohibit exclusion from preexisting conditions both help young people with mental health and substance abuse disorders stay on and keep injured and be able to get access to insurance when they may not have access to it otherwise. millions of young people are covered through that process already come and i don't have a specific number but we know that those young people have these disorders are part of that group. >> thank you, senator. >> senator murkowski. >> thank you mr. chairman and i joined the rest of my colleagues in thanking you for calling this hearing on an incredibly important subject. i a
legislation post-columbine did not pass. so the notion that everybody should rely on quote-unquote the energy and force of newtown i would caution not to do that. it's clearly galvanized the country to have an honest conversation and look internally and have a serious conversation, but brady bill and the assault weapon ban were done without, quote-unquote, a columbine or what happened in virginia, any of those incidents. i do believe just in the last four years or i would say the last eight years of politics this, what happened there has made all of us have a discussion that has been sitting on the sidelines or the periphery of politics to be focused and this, obviously, tomorrow morning the president's going to introduce his legislation or his package and decide what legislatively he's going to do, what he's going to do by executive order. but we are at a tipping point to have a discussion that's been postponed, delayed or for whatever reason hasn't happened. but my small kind of flashing yellow light of caution is when you think of the last time we had success which goes back to '93 and '94
the single market remains incomplete and services, in energy, in digital, the very sectors that are the engine of a modern economy, it is only half the success that it could be. it is nonsense that people shopping online in some parts of europe are unable to access the best deals simply because of where they live. so i want completing the single market to be our driving missi mission. i want us to be at the forefront also of the transformative trade deals with the u.s., japan, india as part of the drive towards global free trade. and i want us to be pushing to exempt europe's smallest entrepreneurial companies from more eu directive. they should be the officials, they should be do tasks that get european officials up in the morning and keep them working late into the night. and so we urgently need to address the sclerotic, ineffective decision-making that is holding us back. that means creating a leaner, less bureaucratic union, relentlessly focused on helping its member companies compete. in the global race can we really justify the huge number of expensive peripheral euro
. and the senate becomes the center of governmental energy and creativity, he -- majority leader for six years. instantly the senate is back in the same mess. the nature of political genius is to find a way when no way appears obvious. i had no idea what president johnson would do. hopefully i could research it and find out but someone will come along to do again. >> one major event covered in this book was the u.s. role in the overthrow -- johnson is on record, can you elaborate on what particularly was it on that and why he believes the way he did on that point? ironically one of the things -- >> it is right at the beginning of the book i am writing now. the answer is so complicated and i don't have a summation of its. >> can i go back and refer to your book that you are talking about now? you stated united states was running murder -- >> lyndon johnson -- >> knew that you would get back to that. okay. johnson -- i don't want to be put in a position. johnson did say that, the kennedys for running a damned murder incorporated in the caribbean. exactly what documentation he had we don't know.
and energy goes into the means testing, and eligibility testing, leaving very little money for the actual program. so the programs end up being low dose, very minimal, and they're not sufficient to change the educational outcomes of children. just providing head start program doesn't deal with the fact they're coming from violent homes, violent neighborhoods, poverty, homelessness, food insufficiency. you can't overcome those kind of deficits by providing head start education program. so, that's where the book began. and most of the people advised me said, well, it's a very interesting book. i'm sure you'll get on fox tv. and that was not my goal. my goal was not be a critics so i said let me do part two and say, there are some social programs that are fight effective. and maybe we can learn a lesson from them. and the big quiz that -- in the course of writing the book i conducted, and bored to death my wife and my children, was, let me sit down with anybody i know and tell me the three government programs that have been the most effective in, say, the last 65 years. almost every one modi
and a variety of energy drinks. as a drink in colombia which is a great flavor but again it's not like drinking red bull. it's a very nice kind of stimulant. it would be much better for you. there's a variety of breads and rolls and there's also this is the bag that is basically cheese puffs the government is distributing to kids through a free breakfast program. the folks at the plant went on about how great these were. i thought they were all full myself but i guess the kids like them and i also confess that i hate the taste but there are a variety of products that have very good uses and should be available not only in these countries but also on the international markets there's a variety of uses beyond what the uses for flavoring another that ricardo points out to in his book is related to the conventions. i was struck this relationship between the u.s. drug czar for decades and the president of coca-cola very cozy relationship, so in the end of the 1961 u.n. single conventional the narcotic drugs and the subsequent 1988 convention make it a criminal offense under the international law so
drought or more powerful storms. the path towards sustainable energy sources will be long and sometimes difficult. america cannot resist the transition. we must leave it. we cannot see to other nations to technology that will power new jobs and new industry. we must clear this promise. that's how we'll maintain our economic vitality and national treasure. water race, croplands and snowcapped peaks. that is how we will preserve our planet, coming to her god. that's what will my meaning to their creed once declared. we the people still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [applause] our brave men and women in uniform, tempered by the claims the battle unmatched skill and courage. our citizens feared that the memory of those we lost notes about the price paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep his vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we're also airs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the shrewdest mms carried those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people
very hard on that in the house, energy and commerce committee and we are pleased to see it in the final act. i'm wondering especially given that your testimony talks a lot about the age of onset of many profound mental illnesses being between 16 and 25, whether you are already observing the positive impact of that increased level of assured us for that age population. >> we certainly know that the provision to allow young people to stay on their parents' insurance and the provision to prohibit exclusion from preexisting conditions both help young people with mental health and substance abuse disorders stay on and keep in short or be able to get access to insurance when they may not have access to it. millions of young people are covered through that process already. we know that those young people have these disorders are part of that group. >> senator murkowski. >> i join my colleagues in thanking you for calling this hearing on an incredibly important subject. i am told by my staff and we haven't had experience in the health committee on mental-health issues since 2007. way past time.
on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro-wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across-the-board effort led to the re-opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i have this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, an every single day for the next four years, is jobs. [applause] we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. during the campaign i put out a plan to get washington back to work that grew to over 100 points of action. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry cluster
that a small minority could -- quote -- "destroy the energy of government." that's what madison said. a supermajority would mean that a small minority could -- quote -- "destroy the energy of government." government would, in hamilton's words, be subject to -- quote -- "the priests or ortificess, or insignificant our corrupt junt junta." james madison, as i said, it would -- he said this: "it would no longer be the majority that would riewsm the power woul rul. the power could be transferred to the minority." "federalist paper" number 58. james madison, for the author of our constitution. whesdwhen he said no, you can'te a supermajority. if do you that, then the minority would rule. power would be transferred to the minority. unfortunately, madison's warning has come true. in the senate today, the united states senate, the minority, not the majority, controls. in today's senate, american democracy is turned on its head. the minority rules; the majority is blocked. the majority has responsibility and accountability but the majority lacks the power to govern. the minority has the power
things. they were talking about the cost of energy, because our energy costs remain the highest in the nation, but they were talking about fish. pretty basic stuff -- fuel and fish. food. and so when we had disaster this summer, it was -- it was an imperative around our state. we in september of this past year had an official declaration from the secretary of commerce -- actually, the acting secretary of commerce rebecca blank recognized this fish disaster, and this is a disaster that is statutorily authorized by sections 308 of the interjurisdictional fisheries act and section 312 of the magnuson-stevens fishery conservation and management act. these are designations that are statutorily authorized. these are not earmarks. they are -- they are not to be labeled as "pork" or something special for an area. these are disasters subject to a statutory authorization, a process that has been clearly, clearly laid out, authorized in law for fish failures that requires affirmative action from the secretary of commerce. the secretary has taken that action. congress then needs to do its p
for america, where it passed energy legislation. we passed it to jim legislation and set priorities for the nation, but they failed to go anywhere in the senate. with that, i'll yield to mr. huelskamp. >> thank you, congressman. we might come to a little different vote tomorrow on where we had to we've got to have a budget, but raising the debt ceiling for a budget to be named later is something i probably won't be would've 04. the were trying to follow that, understand we have a sequestered. the resequencing issue. only in washington could that be paris resequenced with going on here. one thing i still remain concerned about after two years up here come i still think it's dysfunctional on the senate side, dysfunctional when the president is going to be laid on his budget, but it's dysfunctional when just a few days ago the house ought to raise $50 billion is spent to, most of which won't be spent till 2015. all say when i visit that could situate at home, this is the worst they've come to expect in washington is from the dust settles at the end of the day, no matter who seems to be
presents an urban energy, when i did not see six years ago the city streets, markets, cars and of course with cars comes traffic jams. cell phone coverage has expanded over 80% of the population and the kids are back in school. human capital summit the biggest changes since 2006 to 8 million afghans and secondary now we rely primarily on ied scum which killed more afghan coalitions. frankly the people are tired and have no desire to be controlled by insurgents. it's worsened over time and taliban movements are springing up as the people of afghanistan rejects the heavy-handed type pics of insurgents. polls indicate the majority of the afghans think the country is heading in the right direction, which is again a significant increase from my time in 2006. in the next phase in the campaign, german by security for subsistence. 400 security for subsistence teams are in place, training, advising and assisting afghan national security forces as they take lead for security. we are now bringing in built for missions, i.'s in many cases that focus on and train to assist the afghan national securit
for health care. here's our plan for energy. here's our plan for defense. and when we do that, when we put our plans out against the president's actual results, i think we'll compare quite favorably. we will win back the trust of the american people. and we will put our plans into action. that's what you do in moments like this. you pick yourself up, you dust yourself off, you fight for what you believe in, and you get back to work. we have a lot to do in the next four years. the challenges continue to mount, and it is so easy to get discouraged by it all. the election loss, the difficulty of the change that's coming. but as william f. buckley, my fellow catholic would say, it's a mortal sin to despair. i'm not ready to give up. and i know you aren't either. you wouldn't be here if you were. that's why i want to ask you for your help. in this effort every conservative needs to be involved. you know, after the election i needed to take a little bit of time. [laughter] i needed, as rich said, i needed to get into the woods because that's where i recharge. so i took my daughter, liza, hunting
have passed good energy legislation, passed good budgeting legislation, we set priority for the nation, but yet they fail to go anywhere in the senate. and so with that, i yield. >> thank you, congressman duncan. i agree with your comments. we might come to a different vote tomorrow. and frankly we have to have a budget. but raising the debt ceiling for a budget to be named later is to be something i probably won't be able to vote for. we're trying to follow that -- understands that. we have sequester. the resequencing is interesting only washington can that be a word. we were trying to resequence what is going on here. but one thing that i still remain concerned about, after two years up here, i think washington is broke. it's dysfunctional certainly on the senate side unable to pass a budget. the president is going late on the budget. it's dysfunctional when just a few days ago this house authorized $50 billion in spending. most of which won't be spent until 2015, and i'll just say when i visit with constituency at home, this is the worst they have come to expect in washington is whe
at the long-term. other than washington, our last gas what he's done on research, on energy, the fact that we're e a national gas supply now that is 75 years out. back in 2002 we heard it's going to be gone and decade. by 2020 going up more oil. >> and there are none. so i will keep talking. >> we have plenty of questions. from winston-salem. >> so, how do we combine conservatism and populism to get power? that's a big problem. here is both might amateurs attempt to do that. i had a dream. i want a $40 trillion economy. i want 1% or 1.5% unemployment. the rights for blacks, latinos, and for women. we can have lot more things to do. we can abolish income tax for the entire middle class. we can send all our kids to private schools. we are rich enough to do it. we've got to make up our minds of what we want to do. that's how it is spent that speaks to how it is an immense amount of capital in the trendy. the question is how it's allocated on how it's used and whether it is used seems for the growth which is why -- >> i would like to bills thought. bill come to britain for your tenure about popul
-thirrenewabl energy mandatereformerof workers'compensation reorganization of stat governmentprotectingou forests an strengthening outimberindustry reforming ou welfaresystem an launching the ntion's first high-speedrail system but of cursegovernin neveends we hav promises tokeepan the most important oneis thonwe made toth people ipropositio 3 passed thatwewoulwoul guard jealously thmone temporarily made available thismeanlivingwithin our means annospendingwhat we don't have. fiscal discipline isno the enemy ofou goo intention buthbasi for ralizin them it'scruetoleadpeopleon by expanding goo program only tcu temcu the back whe thefundin disappears this isn'tprogress it i not eveprogressive. it i a illusion. the stopndgo theboom an busservesnoone. we're no going bacthere. this budge i balancebu grea ris anduncertaintie lie ahead. th federal gvernmentth courts ourchanges in the econom allcoulcostus billions and drive hole in th budget. thultimate cosof expendin ourhealth car system under theaffordable care act areunknow ignoring suc unknown unknowns would bfolly. in facthey'r known unknowns just ai
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